Features

Switchback Railway
Introducing a new weekly post series, Flashback Friday, where we’ll take a look at six legendary coasters that made their mark in the amusement industry. Although many of the rides we’ll cover are no longer in operation, they’re still held in high regard as the innovative designs that brought us to where we are today. In today’s edition of Flashback Friday, we’ll be taking a look at the roller coaster that started it all: Switchback Railway.
Amusement parks might be at the top of everyone's vacation plans, but they're certainly not a cheap activity. Once you add up ticket prices, hotel rooms, parking, meals, and up-charge attractions, the total bill likely makes you gasp. But, with careful planning, you can enjoy a fulfilling amusement park experience without breaking the bank.
Over the past decade, Rocky Mountain Construction has proved to be one of the most innovative manufacturers in the amusement industry. Are you an RMC expert? It's time to find out.
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Dollywood’s record-breaking wooden coaster was expected to shatter all expectations when it opened in April. The problem? It didn’t open until May, and then suffered from a series of issues with its launch system, causing it to shut down. Since then, Lightning Rod has been in and out of technical ride rehearsal, disappointing many enthusiasts who visited the park solely to catch a ride on the coaster. For me, this long summer of waiting proves that innovation comes at a cost.
We're all familiar with the traditional roller coaster – a train on top of the track is pulled to a set height and then uses its own momentum to complete the course. But have you ever heard of a launched shuttle water coaster? No? You'd better keep reading.